A + Orthopaedic and Sports Med Clinic, healthcare

by:Getian     2020-07-22

Joint replacement surgery has evolved over the last 30 years to become one of the most common and predictable procedures in an Orthopaedic surgeons repertoire. Nonetheless, problems with malalignment, loosening, longevity and survivability still arise. Implant survival is multifactorial but proper alignment and orientation of the prosthetic components is an important issue. This is even more important when there is severe deformity or bone loss. The use of computer aided surgery enables surgeons to plan their surgery and optimise placement of implants.

Computer aided or computer 'navigated' surgery has become very popular with success rate crossing over 98 percent in recent years. It utilizes a tracking system and pre-programmed software to provide a 'map' of the operative field. Potentially greater precision and accuracy is possible and this is also especially useful when operating on limbs which are difficult to access or which have severe deformities precluding conventional techniques.

In the last few years Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) in Orthopaedics has taken off tremendously. The technique not only involves a smaller, more cosmetic incision, but more importantly minimizes soft tissue trauma to expedite post-operation recovery for patients. While many joint operations are now performed arthroscopically (key-hole surgery), some operations such as joint replacement still require an open incision. Navigation surgery helps the surgeon to 'see' even when using very small incisions.

This system is the most advanced system in joint replacement. It is unique in that it provides surgeons with preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative assessments of the patient's joint kinematics (movement). Utilization of the Navigation System allows more accurate positioning of the components, this results in better functioning and longer lasting joint replacements. It allows us to do Total Joint Replacement surgery through smaller incisions, resulting in less pain and faster rehabilitation.

The system has three components: an infrared camera; a computer; and instruments with Infrared Light Emitting Diodes (LED's). The LED's are inserted through the surgical incision. The infrared camera senses the LED's and relays the pertinent mathematical equations back to the computer. Fixed reference markers are then placed on each bone, to provide relative positioning. Information is then stored in a mini-computer inside of the instrument. Once all correct information is available, the orthopedic surgeon can make more precise bone cuts.

'It's a precise and accurate tool which provides with a comprehensive understanding of the patient's anatomy before any bone cuts are made'

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